NextLevel Online: 2 Samuel

Session 12: The Books of Samuel in Scriptural Context

Session twelve wraps up our study of 2 Samuel but looking at how both “books” of Samuel fit into their Scriptural context. We will first look back and note many of the parallels between the lives of Samuel and Moses. Then we will look ahead at where we see David in the prophets and especially the New Testament. We’ll examine many of the NT connections and reflect on how David helps us make sense of Jesus.



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SUMMARY: Session twelve wraps up our study of 2 Samuel but looking at how both “books” of Samuel fit into their Scriptural context. We will first look back and note many of the parallels between the lives of Samuel and Moses. Then we will look ahead at where we see David in the prophets and especially the New Testament. We’ll examine many of the NT connections and reflect on how David helps us make sense of Jesus.

NOTES:

  • Looking Back (Samuel and Moses)

    • Parallels:

      • Both are nurtured by women of great faith (Ex 1-2; 1 Sam 1-2).

      • Both have out-of-the-ordinary birth stories (Ex 1-2; 1 Sam 1-2).

      • Both were raised in environments outside their own homes (Ex 2:10; 1 Sam 1:24-25)

      • Both rejected the corrupt aspects of where they were raised (Ex 2:11-12; 1 Sam 2:22-26). o Both received initial revelation and call in the presence of objects on fire but not consumed (Ex 3; 1 Sam 3).

      • In both cases the revelation and call was introduced by double repetition of their name (Ex 3:4; 1 Sam 3:10).

      • Both functioned as judges (Ex 18:13; 1 Sam 7) and prophets (Dt 18:15; 34:10; 1 Sam 3:20).

      • They are the only two prophets in Genesis-Kings to be called “faithful” (Num 12:7; 1 Sam 3:20)

      • Both called to pronounce judgment on corrupt regimes oppressing the people of God (Ex 7-12; 1 Sam 3)

      • Both put a man to death (with their own hands) and then went into a self-imposed exile (Ex 3; 1 Sam 15)

      • Both had two sons (Ex 18:23; 1 Sam 8:2) but in neither case did their offspring play a major role in Israel’s story.

      • Neither was ever called a priest, but both built altars (Ex 17:15; 24:4; 1 Sam 7:17) before the LORD and in other ways acted as priests (Lev 8:14-29; 1 Sam 7:9).

      • Both wrote down commands that were deposited before God and used to guide the nation. (Lev 26:46; 31:9; 1 Sam 10:25)

    • Point?

  • Looking Ahead (David and Jesus)

    • David mentioned over 1000 times in OT…

    • Mentioned 59 times in the NT, mostly in the Gospels and Acts (39+11), 4x in Paul, 2x in Hebrews, and 3x in Revelation.

      • Gospels

      • Acts (1:16; 2:25, 29, 34; 4:25; 7:45; 13:22, 34, 36; 15:16)

      • Paul (Rom 1:3; 4:6; 11:9; 2 Tim 2:8)

      • Hebrews (4:7; 11:32)

      • Revelation (3:7; 5:5; 22:16)

    • Point?

      • Key themes:

      • Who is Jesus?

Questions for Reflection and Discussion:

  • What are some key lessons you have learned from our study of 2 Samuel? (If you watched both, then 1-2 Samuel.) What are your favorite or least favorite stories, and how have you put into practice what we learn there?

  • Before this video, how would you have said that 2 Samuel fits into the overall story of Scripture?

  • Have you ever noticed the parallels between Samuel and Moses? Why do you think the Scriptural authors tell stories in ways that recall others?

  • What are your personal thoughts on David? Like him, hate him, both? Why?

  • What do we learn about David from the way he is talked about in the NT?

  • What do we learn about Jesus from how he is a “new and greater David”?

About NextLevel Online

The vision of Ozark Christian College is to glorify God by evangelizing the lost and edifying Christians worldwide. The mission of Ozark Christian College is to train men and women for Christian service as a degree-granting institution of biblical higher education.